Tag Archives: rates

China, world economy spooking the Fed? No hike in September?

At this point any rate hike looks like a big giant excuse for people to sell off stocks. People want to sell, really sell, one can feel it, but people don’t want to fight the Fed. However, if Yellen shoots a flare into the sky people will move on it. People just want a reason. Which is why Yellen probably won’t move rates.

It would be a pretty bold move for Yellen to hike in the midst of what looks like a possible looming recession in much of the world (Brazil, Australia, China) even if things are barely positive in the US from her perspective. On the other hand if recession is looming a move now might signal confidence in the US economy just enough to let the Fed gather some ammo for what is coming down the line. (Not that a quarter point would make much difference.)

Alternatively we could just have markets set interest rates, like they should, and we could all stop hanging on the words of a financial politburo. But that would make too much sense.

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The Greater Abomination: Washington’s Lies About TARP’s “Success” Are Worse Than The Original Bailouts, Part I

By David Stockman

 

The mainstream economics narrative is so far down the monetary rabbit hole that the blinding clarity of the chart below has no chance whatsoever of seeing the light of day. That’s because it dramatizes the real truth regarding all the Fed gibberish about “accommodation” and “stimulus”. Namely, that what lies beneath its “extraordinary measures”, such as ZIRP, QE, wealth effects and the rest of the litany, is a central banking regime that systematically destroy savers.  Period.

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Dishonesty and Candor in Monetary Policy

In the July 26, 2013 edition of the Bank Credit Analyst,  editor Jim Grant notes that when Ben Bernanke was beginning the second round of “quantitative easing,”  he described it in February 2011 Congressional testimony as equivalent to an interest rate cut. In recent Congressional testimony explaining what might be (or might not be)   a forthcoming “taper” in “quantitative easing,” he suggested that it would not be equivalent to a rate hike.

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